College Admissions Panic?

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An article published in the NYTimes last week, “Greater Competition for College Places Means Higher Anxiety Too,” highlights the increased stress that students feel during the college admissions process, which admissions counselors are saying has led to a higher volume of applications. More students are applying to more schools, which should lead to more options, but “...high school guidance counselors and admissions experts say the heightened competition has turned the process into a anxiety-ridden numbers game.” The article explores how “...applications at more than 70 percent of colleges have increased for 10 of the past 15 years.”

Most Hughes College Prep students will use the Common Application during the admissions process, “— an online application that can be submitted to multiple schools” whose usage numbers “rose to 920,000 through mid-April, compared with 847,000 at the same time last year.”

“Students continue to apply to multiple colleges; the overall average is 4.4 applications, though many students apply to many more, Ms. Blankson said. As of 2013, 32 percent of students applied to seven or more schools, according to the National Association for College Admission Counseling.”

So what does this mean for you?

Since the forecast is that admissions have “turned into more of a lottery, as students express their fears of rejection by applying to more institutions” and “It is seen by (students) as more and more something they can’t control, a crapshoot, so they pile them up…” it’s more important than ever to choose a good range of schools, a few “matches,” a few “reaches,” and a few “safeties.” If you’re applying to options that are good bets both academically and financially, you’re more likely to end up with a confident optimism in the spring, rather than in a panic.

Hughes College Prep can help you select and apply to the right schools for you, and keep you organized through the entire process. We can help you avoid the stress of “the odds game” that admissions counselors are decrying and instead create a comprehensive list of colleges that match your needs and where you’ll be excited to go in the fall.

Read the full article here.